Samurai Teddy Bear will be sold from August, 2017

29.June.2017 | FASHION

Teddy bear, the icon of cuteness has been transformed into a Samurai.

The previous “Boy’s May festival teddy bear” sold out quickly since it was a limited quantity product. This year, teddy bear will become a “Samurai” wearing red body-armor.

As with the previous teddy bear, this teddy bear is the collaborative work of “Ningyo no Kyogetsu” which purses the beauty of forms and Steiff which is a German company. The teddy bear which wears Iyozane Yoroi (Japanese traditional body-armor) and has a cute and pure face is a symbolic Japan/Germany collaborative work.

 

 

A “kabuto”stand is also a part of this set so one can display the “samurai teddy bear” very easily. Also as an option, one can purchase a glass case made out of Japanese lacquered acacia wood, to display the samurai teddy bear in.

Let’s check out this unique Japanese teddy bear which is both cute and cool at the same time.

 

■Information

【Teddy Bear “Samurai”】

Part number: 000287-2 110,000 yen (tax is not included)

Hight: 25cm alpaca

Shingi/Kifuda/Doll stand will be attached

※The material of the body-armor: brass

Part number: 000287-2GC

Glass case: 55,000 yen (tax is not included)

Size: Inside dimensions: 26×42×height 32cm

Outside dimensions: 44×31×height 41cm

Mirrored background/slide open

 

【Available stores】

Steiff official online shop: www.steiff-onlineshop.com

Steiff shops/Steiff corner shops: www.steiff.co.jp/shop/

※Since the stock status differs depending on the shop, please ask the shop about the stock status before visiting the store.

 

Related article:KIDDY LAND Harajuku commemorates 5th anniversary with KAWAII collaboration goods designed by popular illustrator JennyKaori!

 

Related article:Delve into the fantastical world of Sebastian Masuda at “Point-Rhythm World: Monet’s Microcosm”

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    A correlation chart welcomes guests to the grounds. The ‘Kawaii Archival Research,’ a project on kawaii culture conducted with students from the Kyoto University of Arts, collected data on ‘kawaii’ trends from the post-war period to the present day. Through interactions with the worldwide ‘kawaii’ community, it’s clear how much of an impact the aesthetic has had on people around the globe. 

     

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    Sebastian Masuda has also held a Zoom meeting with people in ‘kawaii’ communities around the globe to discover how they became involved with the aesthetic initially, while also asking how it inspired them and gave them strength during these difficult times. Certain people claimed that ‘kawaii’ helped them in their personal growth, while others say it has brought out some of their potential in new and unexpected ways. While Masuda’s artwork may simply seem visual, ‘kawaii’ has become a tool for new communication and personal healing and growth. Some may even call it a kind of therapy: a place where people can surround themselves with color and joy to heal from the difficulties of life. The bold colors of the ‘kawaii’ movement can inspire people to be bold in their daily lives. Individuality should be celebrated and self-confidence should reign supreme–that is yet another message of the ‘kawaii’ movement. 

     

    Many people involved in the Zoom call had never met, and after the initial meeting, the room was left open to give people a place to communicate. Afterward, the ‘kawaii’ circle only became bigger, with a Facebook group bringing together more and more members of the community. 

    The research done during the last year of the COVID-19 pandemic has given ‘kawaii’ lovers a reason to think deeply on how to overcome the many struggles born from the ‘new normal,’ and these forums are perfect places to share colorful messages of hope and strength. 

    Inspired by Masuda’s own struggles during his time in Manhatten in 2013, Colorful Rebellion -Seventh Nightmare- is on display at Kanda Myojin. The installation has previously appeared in locations around the world including New York City, Milan, and Amsterdam. This time, the exhibit was inspired by ‘muro,’ a basement room in Omotesando where amazake is fermented. The room was used as an air-raid shelter during the war, and walking along the dimly-lit path leading to Masuda’s brightly-colored room, it’s hard not to wish that those evacuees could have been surrounded by these beautiful colors instead of pitch darkness. 

    It is no exaggeration to say that this is Masuda’s representative work. Created in the midst of the artist’s own struggles, it has helped establish the philosophy of ‘kawaii’ culture and continues to help those dealing with their own problems.

    The Time After Time Capsule Art Project, starting in 2014 and held in 12 cities around the world, is a massive time capsule filled with messages and wishes for the future. Shaped like the beloved Sanrio character Hello Kitty, the capsule is gradually changing color as it becomes heavier and heavier with wishes for peace and happiness from fans around the world. Originally planned to be exhibited at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, this couldn’t come to fruition due to the current pandemic. This is the first time it is being shown in Japan. 

    The WORLD TIME CLOCK, a once-famous landmark of Harajuku, has also been recreated and installed within Kanda Myojin. 

     

    ‘Yes, Kawaii Is Art’ at Kanda Myojin is a deeply emotional, personal, and inspiring exhibition allowing visitors to experience firsthand how ‘kawaii’ culture is capturing the hearts of people around the world. Sebastian Masuda isn’t slowing down any time soon, and his works will continue to heal people and bring joy for many years to come. 

     

    Sebastian Masuda’s solo exhibition ‘Primal Pop’ will be held at Roppongi Hills A/D Gallery from December 11, 2021, until January 10, 2022.

     

    TEXT:Natalie(MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON)

  • A Sneak Peek at Sebastian Masuda’s ‘Yes, Kawaii Is Art’ Exhibition at Kanda Myojin Shrine

    01.December.2021 | FASHION / SPOT

    The Godfather of Kawaii Sebastian Masuda will open his ‘Yes, Kawaii Is Art’ exhibition at the 1,300-year-old Kanda Myojin Shrine on December 4, 2021. A number of Masuda’s representative works will be on display at the historical site, known as one of the most important shrines during the Edo period. 

     

    Colorful Rebellion -Seventh Nightmare-

    Kanda Myojin Shrine

     

    Colorful Rebellion -Seventh Nightmare- has been shown in New York, Milan, and Amsterdam over the past few years, and will now make an appearance as part of this exhibition. Given the magnificence of the venue, the work will be presented in a unique way–in the basement of the shrine. In addition, a part of the research on Kawaii culture conducted in collaboration with Kyoto University of Arts Ultra Factory will be on display as well. Guests will be invited to ponder the nature of Kawaii, and what makes it so beloved by audiences worldwide.


     

    Colorful Rebellion -WORLD TIME CLOCK-

    Time After Time Capsule Art Project

    Kawaii Archival Research

     

    Near the entrance to the shrine, the Colorful Rebellion -WORLD TIME CLOCK will be on display. Clad in the cutest colors imaginable, it has become a symbol of Harajuku around the world. The Hello Kitty-shaped time capsule, which was on display for five months in New York City in 2015, will also be shown on the temple grounds. The participatory art project has made it to 12 cities around the world so far. 

     

    Kawaii culture will blend with traditional Japanese culture during this exhibition, so keep an eye out for more details coming soon!

     

    What is ‘Yes, Kawaii Is Art?’ 

    Sebastian Masuda has been at the helm of the global Kawaii movement for decades. 

     In 2020, Masuda asked a number of questions to fans of Japanese pop culture around the world–what is Kawaii? Why does Kawaii cross borders, generations, and gender? This new exhibition tries to find an answer to those questions while bringing some joy and excitement to the local community. 

  • Sebastian Masuda Kawaii Exhibition to be Held at 1,300-Year-Old Kanda Myojin Shrine

    16.November.2021 | FASHION / SPOT

    Sebastian Masuda, the Godfather of Kawaii, is bringing his ‘Yes, Kawaii is Art’ exhibition to Tokyo. If that isn’t cool enough, the event will be held from December 4 until December 12, 2021, at the 1,300-year-old Kanda Myojin Shrine, known as one of the most important shrines during the Edo period. 

     

    Kanda Myojin, the Tokyo Venue

    Work at ‘Yes, Kawaii is Art’ Venue in Osaka

    Related Event, 6%DOKIDOKI Fashion Show

     

     

    Originally scheduled to arrive in Tokyo in September, the exhibition was postponed due to the state of the COVID-19 pandemic. Kanda Myojin is known as the site of the Kanda Festival, one of the three major Shinto festivals in Tokyo started by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1600. The shrine is very close to Akihabara, and has become a place for technophiles to pray for their electronics!

     

    Sebastian Masuda is known as the Godfather of Kawaii, and his colorful and crazy art is known around the world. In 2020, Masuda asked a number of questions to fans of Japanese pop culture around the world–what is Kawaii? Why does Kawaii cross borders, generations, and gender? This new exhibition tries to find an answer to those questions while bringing some joy and excitement to the local community. 

     

    Osaka’s City of Art Kitakagaya has hosted Masuda’s exhibition since October 30, with his works spread out across three different venues. These will be open until November 30, 2021. 

     

    Additionally, on November 13, a street fashion show by Masuda’s popular Harajuku fashion brand 6%DOKIDOKI will be held at the third venue. The brand turns 26 this year. 

  • King of Kawaii Sebastian Masuda Opens Exhibition in Osaka

    29.October.2021 | FASHION / SPOT

    Artist Sebastian Masuda is a leading figure in Japan’s culture of KAWAII. The creator of the popular Harajuku brand 6%DOKIDOKI, the creator has worked with Kyary Pamyu Pamyu and a number of other kawaii personalities in the past. Now, his exhibition titled ‘Yes, Kawaii is Art’ is coming to Osaka from October 30 to November 21, 2021. The event will take place in Kitakagaya, an art district located in an old factory area, with three distinct venues opening each week. Each will exhibit a different work. 

     

    Fantastic Voyage Digest Video

     

    Presale tickets for Fantastic Voyage, Prototype II, a performance taking place at the second venue, went on sale on October 21. The prototype was created as a device for ‘imagining the isolated future,’ and shows a transparent capsule traveling through space. The thirty-minute performance will surround viewers with sounds and images and is sure to dig deep into the psyche. 

     

    An exclusive VIP plan will be available on October 30 and 31 and is reserved for only two groups per day. Those who can afford the ¥80,000 per person ticket price can enjoy a luxurious Halloween buffet at the Conrad Osaka hotel. Each scrumptious sweet was designed by Masuda himself, and VIP guests can also tour rooms where his works are displayed. Masuda will accompany visitors to directly explain his works, so the cost might be worth it!

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