MMN Interview (Part 1): Yunomi Enters New Music Territory with Hinami Yuri & Discusses His Label’s Compilation Album

11.January.2019 | FEATURES / MUSIC

Yunomi and YUC’e will release their first compilation album Miraicha vol.0 under their label Miraicha Records on January 12. The album will also be available via download card as well as on major streaming services including Spotify, Apple Music and LINE MUSIC. It features a collection of up-and-coming artists that tie together Japan and the rest of the world.

 

Yunomi’s new song Shironeko Kaizokusen (feat. Hinami Yuri) has a next generation sound that doesn’t get caught up in the music of future bass, a genre synonymous with Miraicha Records. I spoke with both of them to find out about Hinami Yuri’s professional career as a voice actor and singer and Yunomi’s creative wheel as she continue to challenge herself in new territories.

 

Text: Fukuryuu (Music Concierge)

Translation: Joshua Kitosi-Isanga

 

■”The album features people who are free to create music they love as they please”

 

——What kind of label is Miraicha Records

 

Yunomi: It’s a label I work for with YUC’e. There are exceptions, but generally we work with the so called future bass style which was born from Japan’s unique net scene in 2015. We got our friends together and it kind of went from there and we thought we’d put them all onto a compilation album.

 

——I felt that the compilation album was gutsy, it broke down walls. Besides future bass it has many other different sounds too.

 

Yunomi: I don’t like being told what to make by someone else. Miraicha vol.0 features people who are free to create music they like as they please. I’m sure there are a lot of people who don’t know about us yet, so I hope the album can be the thing to get our names out there.

 

——How did you end up featuring on Yunomi’s new song Shironeko Kaizokusen (feat. Hinami Yuri), Hinami?

 

Hinami Yuri: I had the opportunity to provide music for him on another project. There was that, and this time he got in touch with me. That was the first time we actually met and spoke in person.

 

Yunomi: It started with the song Himitsu Dial by the group Kokonatsu on the video streaming website Hinabita♪, but at the time we were just trading the vocal data [online].

 

 

——Was getting to meet her directly as you expected?

 

Yunomi: It was. A lot of the time I have made music and searched for a vocalist, but it was different this time. I made the music for Hinami to sing for me. I’m glad we got to meet.

 

■”I want to believe that we’re headed into the past”

 

——You entered new territory and updated your sound with Shironeko Kaizokusen (feat. Hinami Yuri), correct? It has the quality of storytelling like that in a movie, I was taken aback.

 

Yunomi: I’m happy you thought that of it.

 

——How was it taking on and singing for this song, Hinami?

 

Hinami Yuri: I was really surprised that I was given this kind of song. It really is a great song, isn’t it.

 

——I also get western, more international music elements from it. It has a rhythm that feels very of this age, and I even hear melodious vibes of 90’s UK rock in there. Your degree of perfection has increased. What things did you focus on during production?

 

Yunomi: It’s a long story (laughs).  This song was written for the compilation album, but somewhere along the way I want to include it on my own album. My next album will be my second, but it’s the first time I’ve really thought that I want to write one.

 

——Your first album Yunomokyu is a kind of best-of hits record of songs you’ve released to date.

 

Yunomi: I want to create my second album with a concrete theme. Each song needs a role, and I want to make new sounds. It can’t be helped if I do the same things as with my first album. Also, it made me happy when you said that my degree of perfection has increased. In truth, I’d venture to say the sounds are bad. Looking at it it has an analogue feel to it. I’m looking to see how I can defile it with the art of music software. Up to now, EDM, future bass and music has come to change and develop, hasn’t it? In fact, it has advanced together with synthesizers. It’s the evolution of software. Specs on computers have gotten better so you can do new things. But I also feel the situation has become saturated recently. Like we’re in a perpetual state so focused on making good music.

 

——I see.

 

Yunomi: While that’s been happening I’ve wondered where music is headed in the future. I want to believe that we’re headed into the past. So while being conscious of the so-called pop structure [of music] and things like drum patterns I’ve ventured to challenge myself to making them with future bass-like techniques.

 

——You have acquired your own originality. I felt qualities of 90’s alternative rock in your phrasing like riffs. And the melodies have a kind of UK rock taste. It’s like an entire band is in there.

 

Yunomi: That’s the kind of image I had in mind. People move their bodies and make phrases when playing instruments like guitars and keyboards, don’t they? But there are a lot of people making EDM and future bass who don’t move at all. There’s a lot of people who’ve never played an instrument either. I use a keyboard to check timbres but when it comes to actually punching in the phrases I use a mouse and programming. In doing that I have challenged myself to see how I can reveal my human nature and physicality. It’s for that very reason that I’ve been particular about making sure to show that it’s a human doing it.

 

■”I’m sure it’s a phrase that wouldn’t have come from my head through into the mouse”

 

——Your senses towards the process of completing your work is changing, isn’t it?

 

Yunomi: Talking about the process of making Shironeki Kaizokusen (feat. Hinami Yuri), there are copyright-free rap phrases in there. I chopped up and rearranged them all, put them with the backing track I had already made, and made phrases by altering the pitch of those rap pieces. I left the horizontal time axis of the rap phrases as they were and changed the movement of the vertical pitches to make the melody. I’m sure it’s a phrase that wouldn’t have come from my head through into the mouse. I’m intentionally challenging myself to make those kind of “bugs.”

 

——Despite that, there is a real melodious balance that moves you. When it comes to that, it’s important to select a vocalist who can materialise it―as a human.

 

Yunomi: That’s for sure. I think it’s fairly difficult for other people to do. The lyrics are based on English pronunciation, so all the syllables are complex.

 

Hinami Yuri: I never thought there’d be this much pressure after recording (laughs)

 

All: (laughs)

 

Yunomi: I was able to say everything I wanted about the song (laughs).

 

 

Continued in Part 2.

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