Travel Q&A: 10 Rules & On-the-House Services at Japanese Restaurants

19.April.2018 | FEATURES / FOOD

Restaurants in Japan have a very different list of rules, on-the-house services and etiquette standards compared to other countries. If you enter a restaurant when in Japan without knowing some of these things you might make a mistake!

 

We’ve put together a list of 10 important points to learn before dining out in Japan.

 

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1.Don’t give tips

The fact that you don’t need to give tips as restaurants in Japan can be bewildering to some foreign tourists. In Japan, there’s normally no service charge, unless it’s a high-end restaurant, in which case it’s possible that a service charge will be added. If you force a tip on the staff, they will get told off by their superiors later, so keep that in mind.

 

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2.Watch out for ‘Otooshi’

Otooshi, also known as tsukidashi, are small appetizers served at bars and establishments that sell alcohol, particularly izakaya. They will be served event if you didn’t order them, and you can be charged for them. There are numerous reasons they give for serving ootoshi, such as ‘proof that we have taken your first order’ and ‘something to eat while you wait for the first food to come out.’ Lots of tourists not accustomed to this practice have felt cheated.

 

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3.Water is free

When you sit down at a restaurant in Japan, you’ll be served water. Many tourists are surprised at the fact that cold water is served all year round the majority of the time in Japan. There are also establishments that serve free hot green tea instead of water.

 

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4.The unexpected things are expensive (or cheap)

It’s not rare for things like delivery pizza or Korean pork belly BBQ, which are extremely cheap and common foods in other countries, to be expensive in Japan. On the other hand, you can eat Japanese foods like sushi, tempura and ramen at a very cheap price.

 

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5.You order alcohol first at an izakaya

It’s not a set rule, but generally when you go to an izakaya, ordering a drink gives you plenty of time to read through the menu. Beer is often ordered before anything else. There’s even a set phrase for it, toriaezu biiru (‘[I’ll have] beer for now’). Try saying it in Japanese when you’re at an izakaya.

 

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6.All-you-can services

Restaurants in Japan often have all-you-can-eat and all-you-can-drink services. If you pay a set price, you can eat or drink as much as you like. Many places offer this service, including, but not limited to, izakaya, yakiniku restaurants, and sushi bars. We recommend this to people who want to pay a little to get a lot!

 

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7.Oshibori are free

Oshibori, or moistened towels, are given for free at Japanese restaurants. They are wet towels used to wipe your hands and face before a meal. Depending on the restaurant, you may be given a cold or hot towel. Staff at izakaya will also hand them to you. A lot of tourists praise this service as high quality.

 

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8.Rules and menus are different at fast food restaurants

International restaurant chains like McDonald’s and Subway are of course in Japan too. If you’re a tourist bored of Japanese food, you’ll probably want to eat something familiar like fast food. In those times, you’ll be baffled by the differences between a fast food joint in your own country and in Japan. For example, in the case of McDonald’s, the Japanese large-sized drinks are smaller than the medium-sized drinks in the US. There’s also no self-service. Instead, the staff will pour the drink for you.

 

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9.You cannot take food into restaurants (though there are exceptions)

One rule that puzzles a lot of people from Asia that come to Japan is the rule that states you cannot enter a place with food or drink. However, select establishments, such as food courts in large shopping malls, will permit you to do so. Be sure to do some research beforehand.

 

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10.Take your shoes off on tatami

At izakaya and traditional Japanese restaurants, they implement customary Japanese style seating and tatami flooring. If you’re dining at a place with tatami mats, you must take your shoes off before stepping on it. The table seats and tatami are split into different areas even if it’s the same restaurant, so even if it’s OK to wear your shoes at table seats, you’ll need to take off your shoes when using tatami in most cases.

 

 

Did you learn something new? Sit alongside the locals when you come to Japan and enjoy some delicious Japanese cuisine!

 

If you have any questions you want answering about Japan, then please be sure to get in touch with us on the MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON Facebook page!

https://www.facebook.com/msmsnippon/

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  • 【TRAVEL Q&A】From Shinjuku to Hakone Hot Spring via Odakyu “Romancecar” Line!

    14.February.2018 | FEATURES / SPOT

    Hakone, Kanagawa is one of the most popular “onsen” (hot spring) towns in Japan. The area is popular among both Japanese people and tourists from foreign countries since it is close to Tokyo and has many sightseeing spots such as Ahinoko (lake), Owakudani (valley) and Hakone Chokoku no Mori Museum.

     

    There are several ways to go to Hakone but I recommend using the “Odakyu Romancecar” (limited express train) run by Odakyu Dentestu which departs from Tokyo. It takes about an hour and 40 minutes and you can go to Hakone direct. In this article, I will inform you of how to ride on the “Odakyu Romancecar” to go to Hakone.

     

    1: How to ride Odakyu Romancecar?

    Let’s get tickets first. The tickets you must buy are “Joshaken (normal fare)” and “tokkyuken (limited express surcharge).” The “Joshaken” is an Odakyu Dentetsu limited ticket and the fare differs according to the station that you will get off at. “Tokkyuken” is a ticket you must buy when riding on a limited express train which means you must buy this ticket in addition to the “joshaken.” There are three ways to buy these tickets.

     

    1) Making a reservation/purchasing the ticket via the Internet

    2) Making a reservation/purchasing the ticket at a ticket counter/ticket vending machine

    3) Making a reservation on the telephone.

     

    Making a reservation by telephone is not recommendable for those of you from foreign countries since English-speaking staff are not available.

     

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    2: How to but a ticket via the Internet?

    Using e-Romancecar is recommended when using the Internet to buy a ticket. As a matter of course, you can use a credit card on this web site. You can ride the Romancecar by just by handing out the printed sheet or showing the screen of your smart phone to the staff at the ticket counter. If you are planning to just make a reservation (not paying the fare) on the web site, you must pay the fare by using the ticket vending machine or at the ticket counter before getting on the Romancecar. It is recommended that you buy your ticket beforehand if the date that you are going to Hakone is decided.

     

     

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    3: How to buy a ticket/make a reservation via the ticket counter at the station?

    The ticket counter is normally open from 6:30 to 21:00. The ticket vending machines can be used any time (except for when the trains are not running) but credit cards cannot be used. You can purchase tickets for up to 8 persons at once using the vending machine. So, those of you who are planning to go to Hakone with a group of more than 9 people you must purchase your tickets at the ticket counter.

     

     

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    4: Let’s get on to the Romancecar!

    Now let’s learn how to get on a Romancecar. There are several types of Romancecars available – MES (Type 6000), VSE (Type 50000), EXE (Type 30000) and LSE (Type 7000). The fares for all types are the same. You can eat a limited-“bento” (box lunch) if you make a reservation 3 days (AM) before you ride the Romancecar.

     

    Why not experience a ride on the “Romancecar” and enjoy the hot springs in Hakone. Wishing you a pleasant trip! MMN will introduce to you many kinds of “Q&As in Japan.”

     

    If you have any questions, feel free to send a message to MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON’s FB account!

    https://www.facebook.com/msmsnippon/

  • Travel Q&A: What’s The Cheapest Way to Get to Central Tokyo From Narita Airport?

    10.February.2018 | SPOT

    Airports in Japan are typically quite a distance from the heart of Tokyo metropolis. There are various ways of getting to the center of the capital including by train, bus and taxi.

     

    But which is the cheapest?

     

    We compared various methods of transportation, taking into account their prices and time taken to get to central Tokyo. Let’s take a look.
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    1: By Train
    JR Narita Express (N’EX) – 54 minutes
    Narita Airport→Tokyo Station (¥1,320〜¥3,020)
    The JR Narita Express, also known as N’EX, conveniently connects Narita International Airport with major urban areas in Tokyo including Tokyo Station, Shinjuku, Shibuya and Yokohama. All seats are reserved, but if you purchase a ticket to ride in the Ordinary Cars (not the first class Green Cars), you can ride at a cheap price.

     

    Website: http://www.jreast.co.jp/e/nex/ (Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean)

     

    Keisei Skyliner – 40 minutes
    Narita airport→Nippori Station (¥2,465)
    To board the Keisei Skyliner, purchase a ticket from the ticket office or automatic ticket machine by the ticket gates at Narita International Airport. All seats are reserved, so you are guaranteed a seat. From Nippori Station, you can board the Yamanote Line and head to central Tokyo, Ueno, Ikebukuro, Shinjuku and other major urban areas in the city.

     

    Website: http://www.keisei.co.jp/keisei/tetudou/skyliner/ (Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean)

     

    Limited Express via Keisei Main Line – 1 hour 16 minutes
    Narita Airport→Nippori Station (¥1,025)
    This method of transportation takes the longest amount of time, but it’s also the cheapest. There are no station changes on the way. Before you reach Nippori Station you will stop at Oshiage Station, where you could get off to stop by Tokyo Skytree and Asakusa.

     

    For other routes, visit the Narita Airport website below where you can search how to get from Narita Airport to  your destination.
    http://access.narita-airport.jp/en/index.html (Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean)

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    2: By Taxi (¥29,050 approx.)
    Narita Airport→Tokyo Station – 2 hours 34 minutes approx.
    Compared to other methods, the price of commuting via taxi is expensive, but you don’t have to worry about having to buy a ticket and there are also no waiting times. You can also stop off somewhere you like on the way and enjoy yourself until you reach your hotel or accommodation.

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    3: By Limousine Bus (¥2,800)
    Narita Airport Terminal 2→Tokyo Station Yaesu Central Exit – 1 hour 35 minutes approx.
    The limousine buses arrive every 20 minutes or so at Tokyo Station and Narita Airport. You can book a seat in advance or on the day. The bus also goes through many popular tourist spots such as Ginza, Shibuya and Asakusa. It takes longer than the train, but you’ll arrive at your destination without worry of getting lost or getting off at the wrong stop.

     

    Website: http://www.limousinebus.co.jp/route/index.html (Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean)

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    Was this information helpful? If you’re commuting from Narita Airport, then be sure to use it as reference.

     

    MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON will continue to answer frequently asked questions about Japan. If you have any questions about Japan, then be sure to send us a message via the official MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON Facebook page!
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  • Japan Q&A: Get the most from your Tokyo sightseeing with a 1-Day Travel Pass

    09.February.2018 | FEATURES / SPOT

    When you’re in Tokyo, the main method of transportation for getting around the city’s 23 wards is via the subway – specifically, via JR, Tokyo Metro and Toei Subway. Each of these services offer their own affordable 1-day travel tickets that can be used across all lines, making them a useful tool to have. Let’s take a look at some of the questions regarding 1-day passes.

     

    5 Must-Haves For Tokyo Sightseeing!

    To make the most of your Tokyo trip, we recommend one of the following five 1-day passes for efficient travelling. You and board and get off as many times as you like, so there’s no need to worry about extra fees – you can tour all of the sightseeing spots at your own leisure.

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    • JR East Japan – Tokyo Metropolitan District Pass (“Tokunai Pass”)

    The “Tokyo Metropolitan District Pass” is a day ticket that allows unlimited rides on local and rapid JR East trains around the 23 special wards of Tokyo. You are free to sit in any seats excluding reserved seating, and can even board the shinkansen within the designated area. The Tokyo Metropolitan District Pass can be purchased inside JR East Japan stations, ticket windows, the Travel Service Center (View Plaza), and travel agencies. It’s ¥750 for adults and ¥370 for children.

     

    • Tokyo Metro 24-hour Ticket

    This ticket enables unlimited rides on all Tokyo Metro lines. Costing just ¥600 for adults and ¥300 for children, tickets can be bought in advance or on the day at ticket vendors located in all stations. Not only can you visit Tokyo’s 23 special wards, but the ticket also covers the commuting distance of Saitama and Chiba too, making it convenient for amusement and business. With this in hand, you can travel to any of the major areas.

     

    • Toei One-Day Pass (“Toei Marugoto Kippu”)

    A Toei One-Day Pass gives you unlimited access to the Toei Subway, Toei buses, Toei Streetcar (Toden), and Nippori-Toneri Liner. It’s ¥700 for adult and ¥350 for children. An additional fee is required for night buses to make up the difference – ¥210 for adults (¥206 with IC Card) and ¥100 for children (¥103 with IC Card). Tickets can be bought in advance or on the day at a ticket vendor located inside all stations.

     

    • Common One-Day Ticket for Toei Subway and Tokyo Metro

    The Common One-Day Ticket allows unlimited use of the Toei Subway and Tokyo Metro Subway Lines for an entire day. It costs ¥900 for adults and ¥450 for children. Tickets are available to purchase from automatic ticket vending machines at all Toei Subway and Tokyo Metro Subway stations, as well as Narita Airport and Haneda Airport. This ticket allows free travel from Narita Airport and Haneda Airport to Tokyo’s 23 special wards and the commuting distance of Saitama and Chiba. This one’s a real bargain!

     

    • Tokyo 1-Day Ticket

    As well as the Toei Subway, Toei buses, Toei Streetcar (Toden), Nippori-Toneri Liner, and all Tokyo Metro lines, the Tokyo 1-Day Ticket can also be used on the JR Lines around Tokyo. You can ride and get off at all the major locations in Tokyo for one whole day. At just ¥1,590 for adults and ¥800 for children, this ticket is very affordable. Available at automatic ticket machines at all stations. We recommend this one for people looking to travel across a wide distance.

     

    Tokyo Sightseeing With Private Railways? Take These 2 With You!

    Private railway free passes are a super handy tool to have if you’re heading somewhere JR and subway tickets don’t cover. They’re convenient for access from the inner city to the Shitamachi areas, and are pefect for exploring those hidden, tucked-away gems.

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    • Tokyo Exploratory Ticket (Tokyo Tansaku Kippu)

    Not only does this ticket give discounts on round-trip ticket fares from Keio Line, Inokashira Line, Tobu Isesaki Line and Tsukuba Express to the inner city, it also offers unlimited rides with Toei all day. That includes Toei buses,  Toei Streetcars (Toden), Nippori-Toneri Liner, and of course the Toei Subway. If you hold a Tokyo Exploratory Ticket, you can also receive discounts and gifts from facilities along each Toei line. These services are located at all manned stations on all lines. Please be aware that prices and the system changes depending on which station you purchase the ticket from.

     

    • Tokyo 1DAY Kippu

    This ticket comes as a set: a round-trip ticket from all stations on the Keikyū Main Line to Shinagawa, and unlimited rides with Toei. If you hold a Tokyo 1DAY Kippu, prepare to receive discounts and gifts at popular facilities and spots around Tokyo. This ticket can be purchased at all stations on the Keikyū Main Line barring Sengakuji Station and costs ¥900 from Shinagawa, ¥1,130 from Yokohama, and ¥1,700 from Yokosuka-Chūō.

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    Was this article helpful? Be sure to get the most out of your Tokyo trip by getting the right ticket for you.

     

    MMN will continue to answer your questions about Japan in our “Japan Q&A” series. If you have any questions regarding Japan, then please be sure to get in touch with us on Facebook♪

    https://www.facebook.com/msmsnippon/

  • 【Travel Q&A】Step-By-Step Guide to Praying Etiquette at Japanese Shrines & Temples

    31.December.2017 | SPOT

    Visiting shrines and temples is one of the must-do activities when visiting Japan to really experience the traditional culture. But did you know there are certain rules to follow when praying at a shrine? But do not worry, it’s actually quite simple. We will walk you through the process step by step so you know exactly what to do when you arrive at a shrine or temple during your trip to Japan.

     

    1:Shrines? Temples? What’s the difference?

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    First of all, let’s clear up the difference between a shrine and a temple. Temples came from countries such as China and India to spread Buddhism. They are places to worship Buddha and are installed with statues of Buddha. Buddhist monks live to spread the teachings of Buddhism. Inside the temples are bhikkhu (monks), bhikkhuni (female monks), temple masters and more who enshrine the image of Buddha.

     

    Related article:【Tokyo Stroll】Strolling around Asakusa for half of the day finding the stereo typical sightseeing spots and new spots.

     

     

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    On the other hand, shrines originated from primitive, scared altars such as “iwakura” (sacred rocks) and other places where the gods are said to live – places where people cannot enter. They were temporarily erected during special occasions. Shrines that you see today were not originally a permanent structure. Their origin is different from those of temples that came from abroad. Shrines originated in Japan and their history there goes back further than Buddhism, making them much different from temples.

    Related article:Visit Temples and Shrines, and Collect Goshu-in!

     

     

    2:So, how do I pray?

    There are several steps to follow when praying at a temple or shrine in Japan. These steps may also differ from temple to shrine, so be sure to check properly before starting.

     

    Shrines & Temples

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    Praying

    The general starting point is to throw some money into the offertory box. Most people throw in a ¥5 coin. This is because “5 yen” in Japanese is pronounced “go-en,” which is a homophone with the word for “good luck” (ご縁).

     

    Bell

    If there’s a bell positioned above the offertory box, then be sure to ring it by shaking it back and forth. This is done to call the gods to the shrine.

     

    Can I take photos

    Many places will not allow you to take photos. Be sure to check thoroughly whether there is a warning sign or not. Even if you see people taking photos, make sure to check for yourself.

     

    Related article:【Tokyo Stroll 】A power spot at the heart of Tokyo? Half a day at Meiji Shrine!

     

    Shrines & Temples

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    “Temizuya”

    The first thing you’ll find when arriving at a shrine and many temples is the “temizuya” (water purification basin). This is where you wash your hands and rinse your mouth to cleanse yourself before praying.

     

    There are several steps to follow:

    1) Hold the ladle with your right hand and wash your left hand – then do the opposite.

    2) Take the ladle with your right hand and scoop some water. Pour the water into your left hand and rinse your mouth with it. Make sure to never bring the ladle to your mouth. Spit the water next to the fountain, never directly back into it.

    3) With the ladle still in your right hand, rinse your left hand one last time. Done.

     

    Praying at a shrine – bowing and clapping

    1. Come before the shrine, perform a light bow and ring the bell.
    2. Toss your money into the offertory box.
    3. Perform 2 deeper bows (30°-45° angle), bring your hands to the front of your chest, pray, then clap twice.
    4. Finally, bow deeply one last time, and you’re done!

     

    Temples

    Praying at a temple – bowing

    1. Perform a light bow, throw your money into the offertory box and ring the bell.
    2. Bring your hands to the front of your chest, pray, and perform a final light bow.

     

    What’s the best way to tell if you’ve come to a shrine or temple, I hear you asking? If you passed under a “tori” on your way in, you’re at a shrine. They’re usually red and look like big gates with two main pillars. If you passed under a “sanmon,” you’re at a temple. These are often complete with a roof and look like mini-temples in their own right. The praying process at shrines and temples are much different so be sure to check where you are first!

     

    Temples

    Incense

    Some temples have an incense holder stationed outside, where you can purchase your own bundle of “osenko” (incense) to burn. If you’re lighting your own incense, be sure to put out the fire by hand and never blow it out. But before you do, make sure you wave some of that incense smoke onto you as it’s said to have healing powers! If there’s a weak part of your body, too, then be sure to try it out.

     

     

    3:What’s a “Goshuin”?

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    Goshuin

    The must-do popular thing right now is collecting “goshuin” (red seal stamps). These stamps are given at shrines and temples to show that you have visited those places. In addition to the shrines’ and temples’ unique seals, specially trained writers will write the name of the shrine or temple, the date at which you visited and sometimes other information, all in calligraphic writing. One of the reasons for the goshuin popularity is for the artistry behind it all as the penmanship and designs are different depending on which place you visit. Whether you visit the same place twice or just the date is being written for you, each and every goshuin entry has its own unique characteristics and feeling put into the characters depending on the person writing for you, meaning your entry will be the only one of its kind in the world. You will require a goshuin stamp book to receive a stamp entry. They are sold at many of the popular shrines and temples.

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    We have an article about collecting cute goshuin on the MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON website so be sure to check it out!

     

    Related Article: 【Tokyo Stroll】 Lost in a world of shrine arches and lucky sand! Head to Anamori Inari Shrine near Haneda airport!

     

    Was our guide useful? We hope you use it for reference when visiting shrines and temples in Japan.

     

    MMN will continue to answer questions related to Japan and Japanese culture. If you have any questions about Japan then be sure to hit us up on our Facebook page!

    https://www.facebook.com/msmsnippon/

  • 【TRAVEL Q&A】What is Hatsumode? Q&A regarding Japanese year’s end and New Year’s holiday customs

    30.December.2017 | FEATURES / SPOT

    The year’s end and New Year’s holiday of 2017/2018 for most people will be from the 29th of December to the 3rd of January. In this article, I will introduce to you some year’s end/new year’s holiday customs in Japan.

     

    What do you have to be aware of when traveling during the year’s end/New Year’s holiday?

    Many stores and facilities are closed during this season. Make sure to check out the websites of the places that you want to visit beforehand.

     

     

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    What is hatsumode?

    “Hatsumode” is a New Year’s custom where people visit shrines and temples to wish for a good year. After offering prayers at temples/shrines, many people buy paper fortunes or amulets. To offer a prayer, visit shrines or temples. Each shrine/temple is considered to have different “powers” such as prosperity in business and success in academic learning so make sure to check out which shrine/temple suits your wishes. It is also fun to buy food/goods at stalls and it is recommended to eat some food like yakitori (grilled chicken), yakisoba (stir-fried noodles) and cotton candy. Don’t forget to wear warm clothes when visiting a shrine/temple.

     

    Detailed information RE how to offer a prayer:https://www.moshimoshi-nippon.jp/68492

     

     

    Some customs during New Year’s holidays

    There are some traditional decoration items for the New Year’s holidays.

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    ・Kadomatsu

    Kadomatsu is a New Year’s decoration made of bamboo and pine tree branches and it is often decorated at the entrance of the house. Kadomatsu is thought to be an earmark decoration at the entrance of a house so that the Gods can come to one’s house directly.

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    ・Kagamimochi

    Many Japanese believe that the Gods visit one’s house on New Year’s Day and kagamimochi is an item to welcome the gods. It is said that kagamimochi should be prepared before the 28th of December. The Gods will come to your house when the sun rises on the New Year’s Day so make sure to prepare it before the 28th. Kagamimochi must continue to be decorated until the 11th of January.

     

     

     

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    Shinkansen bullet trains are very cworded!

    Since many Japanese people meet with their family members during New Year’s holidays, shinkansen bullet trains can become very crowded. Therefore, it is recommended that you make a reservation in good time.

     

     

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    What are hatsuuri and fukubukuro?

    The word “hatsuuri” means the first sales in the New Year. Many stores sell fukubukuros (lucky bags with random products). By purchasing such a bag  one can try their luck. Usually, you cannot see what is inside the fukubukuro but some fukubukuros includes expensive items which means you have a chance to buy something expensive at a very low price.

     

     

    What do Japanese people eat during year’s end and during the New Year’s holidays?

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    ・Toshikoshi Soba (buckwheat noodles)

    “Toshikoshi soba” is a food which Japanese people eat on New Year’s Eve for good luck. The origin of this custom is unknown, but some people say this custom has the meaning of “severing bad luck by eating easy to break buckwheat noodles” or “wishing for longevity by eating long noodles.” You can eat these buckwheat noodles warm as in “kakesoba” or cold as in “zarusoba.” However, make sure to finish your noodle dish before New Year’s Eve ends because it is said that eating toshikoshi soba after crossing over into the New Year brings bad luck.

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    ・Osechi

    Osechi is a multitiered box filled with food which brings good luck. Each food/ingredient brings a different kind of luck such as a rich harvest, perpetual youth and longevity and prosperity of descendants.

     

    ・Ozoni

    Ozoni is a shoyu/miso flavored soup with mochi (rice cakes) inside. The shape of the mochi and ingredients differ depending on the house or the local area.

     

     

     

    How did you like this introduction to New Years customs? Let’s have a wonderful trip during this coming holiday season.

  • Travel Q&A: Japanese Sento Bath Houses & 6 Recommended Ones in Tokyo

    04.November.2017 | FEATURES / SPOT

    Sento have a different atmosphere compared to Onsen, or “hot springs” in Japan, and we’re here to explain what exactly that is.

     

    1: What’s a “Sento”?

    銭湯

    Sento are public baths located in the towns and cities of Japan whereas the Onsen is a spa where people can relax. One of the big differences between Onsen and Sento is the water. Onsen use hot water from hot spring sources and so the water contains natural ingredients. Sento on the other hand use tap water heated using a gas boiler or firewood. Sento also usually come as an old and traditional-styled electric bath or an outdoor-style bath. They are generally cheaper than Onsen.

     

    2: What should I be aware of in a Sento?

    Sento are used by people of all ages, so it is also called a “public bath.” There are some important rules to be aware of when using them.

     

    The first thing is getting naked. You must first take off all your clothes before entering the bathroom. This is a basic rule in Japan. You can take a washcloth with you to both hide your private parts and to wash with. Before you soak in the bath, you must first wash and rinse your body. And remember to never put your washcloth in the bath, and of course that also means you cannot wash your clothes in the Sento. Use the basin a chair to clean yourself and then return them put to their original place for the next person to use. When you enter the dressing room after bathing, you need to wipe your body with your washcloth so as to prevent getting the dressing room floor from becoming wet.

     

    3: How much is the entrance fee to a Sento?

    Sento prices are fixed everywhere. Those ages 12+ pay ¥460, 6-12 pay  ¥180 and under 6’s pay ¥80.

     

    4: I need more information!

    If you want to know more information about Sentos, you should check out the Tokyo Sento Association website here: http://www.1010.or.jp

    You can also check out the rules of using Onsen here: http://www.moshimoshi-nippon.jp/ja/70040

     

    5: What are some recommended Sentos in Tokyo?

    Let’s take a look at 6 different Sento in Tokyo.

     

    Yuya Wagokoro Yoshinoyu (Suginami Ward, Tokyo)

     


    This Sento has a modern, fashionable and traditional Japanese “wa” style. There are both inside and outside baths as well as a sauna available to use in both the women and men’s bath for an additional fee. In the outside bath, there are carbonated springs, tubo-yu, and a cold water bath. Tubo-yu has a good effect on your skin and is great for stiff shoulders and and lower back pains.

     

    ■Information

    Yuya Wagokoro Yoshinoyu

    Address:1-14-7 Naritahigashi, Suginami-ku, Tokyo

    Hours:13:30~22:00

    Holiday:Monday

    TEL:03-3315-1766

    Website:http://yoshinoyu.sakura.ne.jp/index.html

     

    Shimizuyu (Minami-Aoyama, Tokyo)

    This is a very fashionable Sento. Its guests are often fashionable young people and business people. All water in this here is soft water and has a high concentration of carbonated springs. Silk baths are available too. They serve draft beer, Belgian beer, ice cream and snacks. They also sell towels, lotions and underwear so you can go there practically empty-handed.

     

    ■Information

    Shimizuyu

    Address: 3-12-3 Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo

    Hours: Monday to Friday12:00〜24:00

    Saturday・Sunday・Public holidays 12:00〜23:00

    Holiday:Friday

    TEL:03-3401-4404

    Website: http://shimizuyu.jp/index.html#about

     

     

    Tenjinyu (Shimbamba Station, Tokyo)


    This Sento was renewed in 2009 and designed by specialised designers. It is a space where you can feel comfortable and calm with its warm interior decorations and lighting. The most popular bath is the “Kuroyu” which uses hot water pumped up from 100 meters underground. Ingredients from the Paleozoic era are melted in the water. That plus a multitude of minerals makes it good for making your skin look beautiful. Experts say that the water is one of the 3 most densest Japan.

     

    ■Information

    Tenjinyu

    Address:2-23-9 Kitashinagawa, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo

    Opening time:15:00 ~ 24:30

    Holiday:Friday

    TEL:03-3471-3562

    Website: http://www.tenjinyu.com/index.html

     

    Minatoyu (Hatchobori, Tokyo)

    The bathroom uses dark stones and tiles, so it has a luxurious feeling and calm atmosphere. Just above the bathtub is a colonnade making the atmosphere is very open. The water in the bathtub uses soft water. There’s an electric bath, a silk bath and 2 kinds of saunas.

     

    ■Information

    Minatoyu

    Address: 1-6-2 Minato, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

    Opening time:15:00~24:30

    Holiday:Saturday

    TEL:03-3551-0667

    Website: http://www.minatoyu.jp/

     

    Isshinyu (Shin-koiwa Station, Tokyo)

     


    The highlight of this Sento is the lovely tile picture on the bathroom wall. In the women’s bathroom there is a mosaic tile depicting animals carrying a Japanese shrine known as a “mikoshi.” It was originally designed to make the children there feel happy. There are two big bathtubs: the circular bathtub is a bubble bath, and the square bathtub has water pillows (like a water bed!).

     

    ■Information

    Isshinyu

    Address: 4-9-8 Matsushima, Edogawa-ku, Tokyo

    Opening time:15:30~22:30

    Holiday:Monday

    TEL:03-3651-6313

    Website: http://www.oyunofuji1010.com/gallery/2015/06/post-9.php

     

    Saitoyu (Nippori Station, Tokyo)

    This Sento has bath water that has a good effect on skin making it popular with female customers. There are beer servers in the Sento, so you can enjoy sipping a refreshing beer after taking a bath. There are five different baths including a high concentration artificial carbonated spring bath, a water bath, an electric bath, a high temperature bath, and an outside bath.

     

    ■Information

    Saitoyu

    Address: 6-59-2 Higashinippori, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo

    Opening time:14:00~23:30

    Holiday:Friday

    Website: http://www.saito-yu.com

     

    How did you like our Q&A about Sento? A visit to a Sento is a must if you really want to “soak in” Japanese culture!

RELATED ENTRIES

  • no mark.Café in Tokyo Collaborates with Parent-Child Art Unit Musee du Aouvre

    21.October.2021 | FASHION / SPOT

    Located in an old traditional Japanese house in Kiyosumi Shirakawa, no mark.Café has a cozy ambiance for guests looking to escape the hustle and bustle of the city. From October 15 until November 30, the cafe is collaborating with the parent-child art unit Musee du Aouvre, and thirteen works from the group’s blog will be on display throughout the building. A campaign will also be held, giving visitors the chance to receive some original coasters and a small wind God figure to sit on the side of a coffee cup. 

     

    Campaign Present A. Aouvre Coaster / B. Aouvre Wind God Figure

     

     

    The cafe aims to be a place where guests can enjoy art as they relax, and to further this idea, they will be collaborating with a number of artists in the ‘CAFE DE ART’ project. 

     

    The first collaboration is with Musee du Aouvre, an art unit consisting of a father and son duo who copy famous works of art. These aren’t just any forgeries–they are incredibly adorable and pay proper homage to the original creations. Thirteen works will be selected from the pair’s blog and will be exhibited under the title ‘The no mark.Café Great Counterfeit Exhibition.’ A 2022 calendar and postcards of the works will be on sale at the store, and videos will provide information about the original works of art. Visitors can also participate in the Twitter and Instagram campaign to win a special collaborative item!

     

  • Enjoy a Weather and Time-based Cream Soda at the Newly Opened ‘Cafe Amayadori’

    19.October.2021 | FOOD / SPOT

    The Oarai Tourism Omotenashi Promotion Council opened Cafe Amayadori, a rain and healing themed coffee shop, on September 18 2021. The shop was opened as a challenge and is located in the Umimachi Terrace Tourist Information Center.

     

    Cafe Amayadori

     

    Cafe Amayadori Menu

    Cafe Amayadori Tote Bag

     

    You can clearly hear the sound of the rain from inside the store, while the served cream soda changes based on both the weather and the time. On clear days where the sun is shining, you can order the traditional green-color  ‘Blue Sky Cream Soda,’ while on rainy days you can order the blue ‘Rain-color Cream Soda.’

    The cafe also serves a wide variety of Japanese and Western meals and desserts, each cooked using local Oarai produce. Morning and lunch specials are also available, meaning you can easily work your visit around your own schedule.

     

    The concept of the cafe is “Rain.” You can dash into the cafe as if you’re looking for shelter from the weather before sitting down to eat and drink in the calm space, emphasized by the soothing music that plays in the background. While the soundtrack depends on the day, the sound of rain is often played. However, the sounds played on rainy days are a little different to the usual. True to its name, the cafe can create a comfortable Amayadori (lit. rain shelter) no matter what the weather!

     

    ‘rain coat studio’ is a group of creators who have been working on ‘rain’ themed events and designs since 2016. The group was formed with the idea that “when it rains, our activities are limited due to the dull weather. On the other hand, the rain represents the season and soothes those who listen to it’s sound.” 

    The group aims to create music, events, artwork, and more, that are cool like the rain but still convey a kindness. The ‘rain coat studio’ came up with the idea of a coffee shop as a way to try creating a restaurant business that followed their ideals.

    The signature item on Cafe Amayadori’s menu is the ‘Weather Cream Soda.’ The flavor depends on whether the weather is clear, rainy, and after-rain, but can also depend on the time – They even offer special drinks for ‘Morning Fog’ and for drinking in the evening, along with a limited-time ‘Seasonal Cream Soda. 

    The cafe doesn’t just serve Cream Soda! Customers who would like a full meal can also order from a selection of Japanese food, Western food, and desserts. A limited edition tote bag is currently on sale to commemorate the opening of the cafe.

     

    Why not try relaxing on a rainy day at Cafe Amayadori?

  • Sumikko Gurashi Themed Cafes Open in Tokyo, Osaka, and Aichi to Commemorate Second Theatrical Movie

    16.October.2021 | ANIME&GAME / FOOD / SPOT

    To commemorate the release of the their second movie, ‘Sumikko Gurashi: Aoi Tsukiyo no Mahou no Ko,’ Sumikko Gurashi will be opening the limited-time ‘Night Party with Sumikko’ cafe in Osaka on October 20, Tokyo on October 21, and Aichi on November 11.

     

    (Advance Reservation Benefit Only) Original Invitation with Postcard (Five types)

     

     

     

    Menu

    Tokage’s Night Party Curry: ¥1,430 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Shirokuma’s Warming Hot Rice Casserole: ¥1,430 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Five’s Recommended Children’s Lunch: ¥1,650 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Magician’s Party ~Açai Bowl~: ¥1,430 (Tax Incl)

     

    Aoi Tsukiyo’s Fruit Punch: ¥1,100 (Tax Incl.) + ¥220 for one mini ice cream

     

    Sumikko’s Pudding Ice Cream: ¥880 each (Tax Incl.)

     

    Starry Drink: ¥990 each (Tax Incl)

     

    Dolomite Coaster

     

    Hot Café Au Lait: ¥880 (Tax Incl.)

     

     

    Original Goods

     

    Acrylic Keyholder (Random out of five): ¥770 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Phosphorescent Sticker (Random out of eight): ¥605 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Acrylic Stand (Random out of five): ¥880 (Tax Incl.)

    Muddler (Three types): ¥1,100 each (Tax Incl.)

     

    Mug Cup: ¥1,980 (Tax Incl)

     

    Purse: ¥1,100 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Fluorescent Pen Set: ¥1,100 (Tax Incl.)

     

    A5 Clear File Duo: ¥605 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Bandanna: ¥1,870 (Tax Incl.)

     

    The Sumikko Gurashi characters are beloved by both adults and children for their gentle touch and tone. Their first movie, ‘Sumikko Gurashi Tobidasu Ehon to Himitsu no Ko’ was released in November 2019 and received great popularity. The sweet story of the Sumikko’s adventures through a story-book world attracted over 1.2 million viewers across Japan.

     

    The heartwarming cafe menu includes “Tokage’s Night Party Curry,” “Shirokuma’s Warming Hot Rice Casserole,” Five’s Recommended Children’s Lunch,””Magician’s Party ~Açai Bowl~,” “Aoi Tsukiyo’s Fruit Punch,” “Starry Drink,” and more. The cute, Instagrammable dishes feature the characters who feature in the movie, which tells a mysterious story that begins under a blue moon in the Sumikko’s hometown. A lineup of limited edition goods and perks will also be available, adding to the movie excitement.

     

     

    Enjoy a cute, social-media friendly meal and original merchandise at the exciting Sumikko Gurashi cafe!

     

    ©2021 Japanese Sumikko Gurashi Association Film Club

  • Kurobe Gorge Trekking Tour Offers Breathtaking Two-Day Trolley Journey

    13.October.2021 | SPOT

    The Kurobe Gorge Trolley in Toyama will offer a special two-day journey through the fall foliage on October 29 and November 1, 2021. 

     

    Atobiki Bridge

    Okukane Bridge

    Promenade

    Babadani Jigoku

     

    On the day of the tour, guests will enjoy a leisurely journey through nature as a Kurobe Gorge tour guide explains the features of the surrounding environment. 

  • 90 Year Old Renovated Public Bath-turn-Cafe ‘Rebon Kaisaiyu’ to Hold Collab Exhibition with Illustrator Miyaoka Chigav

    13.October.2021 | FASHION / SPOT

    Tokyo, Taito-ku based public bath cafe Rebon Kaisaiyu has announced a collaboration exhibition with illustrator Miyaoka Chiga, held between October 10 (public bath day) and October 24 2021, titled “Yu.”

     

    Rebon Kaisaiyu is a renovated public bath which was built 90 years ago, now transformed into a cafe serving home-roasted specialty coffee and handmade ice cream. The wooden tag shoe boxes, watch seats, ceilings, clocks, and Mt. Fuji paintings from the public bath have been preserved, retaining the comfort and warmth of the original building. 

     

    The space was designed around the concept of “connecting memories through a cafe,” striving to become a spot where locals could relax once more, connecting the building with the people of the new generation. The relaxing cafe has 16 seats available and is located only a five minute walk from Tokyo Metro Hibiya Station.

     

    The collaboration exhibition will be filled with artwork using iconic public bath motifs. Miyaoka’s gentle illustrations are sure to soothe your heart, immersing you in the warmth of “Yu” (public baths). Why not relax in this unique cafe with a comforting mug of hot coffee.

     

  • Kyoto’s Kurodani Temple, Typically Closed to the Public, to Accept Visitors for Limited Time

    12.October.2021 | SPOT

    Constructed in 1175, the Kurodani Temple is one of the head temples of the Jodo Sect of Buddhism. Though typically closed to the public, the grounds will open for a short period to allow guests to experience some beautiful autumn scenery beginning November 12, 2021. This temple is associated with the Shinsengumi and served as the headquarters of the Aizu Clan at the end of the Edo period, so those interested in history won’t want to miss out on this incredible opportunity. 

     

    [Night] Shiun Garden

    [Day] Autumn Leaves at the Main Gate

    [Day] Shiun Garden

    [Night] Autumn Leaves at the Main Gate

    Temple Grounds at Sunset

    The Tiger’s Room

    Ohoujou Garden

    Founders Hall

    Live Koto Performance

    Gokoushiyuiamidabutsu, ‘Afro Buddha’ 

     

    Guests will be able to enjoy the gorgeous autumn temple scenery during both daytime and nighttime, with the night viewing also offering some traditional Japanese live music. Visitors can also see various temple treasures and historical items, as well as the Tiger Room, known for its painted doors. The unique and aptly named Afro Buddha will also be on display. After training for an extremely long period of time, the Buddha’s hair piled up, giving him this strangely modern appearance. 

     

    On a clear day, guests will be able to see clear to the Abeno Harukas building in Osaka. Vividly painted ceilings and other statues will completely surround visitors in spiritual history. At night, traditional Japanese music will be played at three different times in the front gardens. On Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the temple will offer a Premium Plan, allowing interested guests to enter the grounds 30 minutes before general admission starts. (This will require reservations made on the official website.) This will also include a guided tour!

     

    How would you like to experience this piece of Japanese history while surrounded by unforgettable autumn foliage? 

  • ‘Shiseido Parlour Ginza Salon de Cafe’ Reveals Limited Autumn Dessert Menu

    08.October.2021 | FOOD / SPOT

    The ‘Shiseido Parlour Ginza Salon de Cafe’ has announced that between October 1 and October 31 2021, customers can enjoy a limited edition Autumnal sweets menu. This year their menu includes the Jersey milk ‘Japanese Chestnut Mont Blanc Parfait from Kyushu’ and the ‘Shine Grape Fruit Sandwich.’ There will also be two special additions to the menu to celebrate the 96th Azuma Odori.

     

    Japanese Chestnut Mont Blanc Parfait from Kyushu using Jersey Milk: ¥2,500 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Strawberry Parfait using “Koihime” strawberries from Nagano’s Hatake Kobo: ¥2,100 (Tax Incl.)

     

     

    Weekday / Limited Quantity Products

    Shiseido Parlour Story: ¥2,600 (Tax Incl.) (Drink Incl.)

    Shine Grape Fruit Sandwich with grapes from Iizuka Orchard: ¥1,700 (Tax Incl.)

     

    Shinbashi Color Ice Cream Soda: ¥1,150 (Tax Incl.)

     

     

    The Japanese Chestnut Mont Blanc Parfait is made using Jersey milk ice cream, chestnut cream, and fresh cream, along with the “Koihime” Fruit Sandwich, made using Kashu “Koihime” Strawberries are available on both the regular and limited Shiseido Parlour Ginza menus. Meanwhile, the luxurious Shiseido Parlour Story and the seasonal Shine Grape Fruit Sandwich, filled with various Autumnal fruits and centred around the grape, are only served on weekdays and holidays in limited quantities.

    In the late Meiji Era, Shinbashi geisha were often seen wearing blue and green kimonos, with the color combination being coined Shinbashiiro (Shinbashi Color.) The elegant and retro Shinbashi Color Ice Cream Soda recreates the iconic look using green apple syrup, lemon, and ginger ale, topped with a traditional vanilla ice cream.

     

     

     Immerse yourself in the season with a feast of Fall sweets in Ginza.

  • Yojiya Hosts Very First ‘Yuzu Fair’ Combining Cosmetics Stores with Cafes

    07.October.2021 | FASHION / FOOD / SPOT

    Yojiya will be hosting the very first Yuzu Fair, an event combining cosmetics stores and cafes, on October 9 2021. Limited edition Yuzu oil-blotting paper and handmade Yuzu hand creams will be available at the beauty stores, while the cafes are full of tasty drinks and sweets. You can discover the charms of Yuzu at each Yojiya store! 

     

     

    Makeup & Miscellaneous Goods’ Store Products

    Yuzu Oil-blotting Paper

    Yuzu Hand Cream

    Yojiya Hand Cream Set

     

    Yuzu Bath Oil

    Aromatic Wood

     

    Cafe

    Yuzu Parfait

    Yuzu Cheese Daifuku

    Yuzu Maritozzo

    Yuzu & Chocolate Shake

    Tea Crepe – Yuzu Tea

    Twitter Campaign Bonus: The first 500 people to enter will receive a special Yojiya Yuzu logo sticker.

     

     

    In 2020, due to the Covid crisis, Yojiya had to make the tough decision to cancel their annual Yuzu series. While the customers were disappointed, Yojiya was convinced that in Autumn 2021, they would be able to welcome their customers into their stores once more for a care-free experience. The event took a year to organize, but has become something even more powerful than the regular Yuzu series.

     

    The cosmetics store staff and cafe staff joined together into one team to create the projects, which has the theme of “Yuzu at Yojiya ~ Enjoy Beauty and Food!~.” Not only can you find limited edition products at the fair, you can also partake in the various campaigns that Yojiya has announced in order to spread the Yuzu love, so be sure to check them out.

     

    Fill your heart and stomach with Yuzu this Autumn at the Yojiya Yuzu Fair!

     

  • LOVOT Cafe Celebrates First Anniversary with Limited Time Desserts and Merch

    07.October.2021 | FASHION / FOOD / SPOT

    The huggable next-generation pet robot LOVOT was first released one year ago, and to celebrate, some limited time merchandise and sweets are now on sale!

     

    LOVOT LOVOT Anniversary Dessert Plate, available until October 31, 2021

    Autumn Only! LOVOT LOVOT Chicken Plate with Mushroom Sauce, available until November 30, 2021

    Coaster / Postcard / Clear Folder

    LOVOT Cafe Original Coaster / LOVOT Cafe Original Smartphone Case

    LOVOT Cafe Original Tote Bag / LOVOT Cafe Original T-Shirt (Unisex)

    LOVOT Cafe Original Case / LOVOT Cafe Original Handtowel 

    LOVOT Cafe Original Ballpen with Charm / LOVOT Cafe Original Mug

    LOVOT Cafe Original American-style Cookie / LOVOT Cafe Original Natural Plate

    LOVOT Cafe Original Pin

     

     

    Featured in the special Dessert Plate is a loveable cake with LOVOT’s face, along with mini rolls, mini cupcakes, and vanilla ice cream with fruit on top. The LOVOT cake is made with milk chocolate and coffee mousse, along with chocolate streusel for a more mature flavor that isn’t overly sweet. Those who visit the store on or after October 1 will receive a limited-edition novelty drawing while supplies last. Coasters and postcards will also be given away on a first-come, first-served basis from October 1 until October 15, while clear folders will be gifted on or after October 16. 

     

    The goods for this collection are based on the theme of ‘LOVE is here,’ so please look forward to these sweet collectibles and many more years of LOVOT!

     

  • Junei Hotel Kyoto Adds New Plan Allowing Guests to Reserve Entire Property

    06.October.2021 | SPOT

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Imperial Palace West, a small luxury hotel located in the heart of Japan’s ancient capital, has revealed a new plan allowing guests to rent out the entire premises. Imagine being in a hotel with only your closest family and friends!

     

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Imperial Palace West – Guest Room

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Imperial Palace West – Bathroom

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Bamboo Suite

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Bamboo Suite Bathroom

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Standard Room

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Standard Bathroom

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Breakfast at Futago

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Futago Restaurant Interior

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto – Dinner at Futago

    Arashiyama Yusaitei

    Arashiyama Yusaitei

    Kibune Riverbed

    Hozucho River Boat Ride

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Rooftop View of Kiyomizu-dera Lights

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Rooftop Garden Moon Viewing

     

    With two locations in Kyoto, guests will be able to enjoy the entirety of the hotel in complete privacy while still enjoying hotel hospitality. With between 8-11 rooms, this would be the perfect spot for a family gathering, wedding reception, graduation trip with friends, corporate meeting place, or even for overseas guests!

     

    The Junei Hotel Kyoto Imperial Palace West opened in 2017 as a community-based luxury hotel with only eight rooms, with a single mission: bringing the beauty of Japan to the world. Beyond simply finding a place to sleep for the night, the hotel wants guests to experience something special and to provide an unforgettable experience. By partnering with local tourism associations, the Junei Hotel hopes to accurately convey the traditions and singular culture of the city of Kyoto. 

     

    In March 2020, a second location opened. The Junei Hotel Kyoto is surrounded by bamboo, and in fact, the theme of the hotel itself is bamboo and the moon. Each of the guest rooms is decorated with traditional and local bamboo crafts, and every detail is pulled from the natural beauty of Higashiyama, Kyoto. 

     

    The restaurant attached to the hotel, Futago, is the perfect place for adults to unwind and recharge. The kappo-style course menu features Kyoto vegetables and seasonal ingredients, blending the delicious with the nutritious. Chefs will cook each dish using a variety of methods, and guests will be amazed by how the flavor of the meat changes from course to course. The menu changes each month, so be sure to come back throughout the year!

     

    Guests can also rent out Arashiyama Yusaitei, a gorgeous building deep in the forests of Kyoto perfect for wedding receptions, photoshoots, tea ceremonies, and more. The rooftop garden offers a stunning view of Kiyomizu-dera and is also perfect for moon viewing. Those wanting to get even closer to nature can enjoy a boat ride down the Hozucho river, and for those craving desserts, a Japanese sweets-making class is also available!

     

    Who would you take with you on a private stay at the Junei Hotel Kyoto? 

  • Universal Studio Japan to Expand Super Nintendo World with Donkey Kong Area

    06.October.2021 | ANIME&GAME / SPOT

    Since opening in March, Super Nintendo World at Universal Studios Japan has caught the world’s attention, leading global game fans to pray even harder for Japan to reopen for tourism. Now, the park is scheduled to level up with a new Donkey Kong-themed area scheduled to open in 2024. 

     

    Currently, Super Nintendo World is filled with Mario-inspired attractions, dining options, and shops, recreating some of the most memorable parts of the franchise in a larger-than-life way. The new Donkey Kong area will feature a roller coaster and more interactive experiences, as well as themed merchandise and food options. Guests will be able to walk through lush jungles, where Donkey Kong and his friends live. The creation of the new area will more than double the size of Super Nintendo World. 

    Launched as an arcade game by Nintendo in 1981, Donkey Kong quickly took the world by storm, with games continuing to be released on Nintendo systems from the SNES to the Nintendo Switch. As of March 2021, the series has sold over 65 million units worldwide.

     

    Comment from Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto

    “I am very happy to be able to make the world of Donkey Kong a reality following the world of Mario. I am looking forward to creating a thrilling Donkey Kong experience with the amazing team at Universal. It will take some time until it is completed, but it will be a unique area for not only people who are familiar with Donkey Kong games but for all guests.”

     

    WIZARDING WORLD and all related trademarks, characters, names, and indicia are © & ™ Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Publishing Rights © JKR. (s21)
    Minions and all related elements and indicia TM & © 2021 Universal Studios. All rights reserved. TM & © Universal Studios & Amblin Entertainment. TM & © Universal Studios. All rights reserved. © Nintendo

  • Three Unique Japanese Cafes You’ll Want to Visit Again and Again

    05.October.2021 | FOOD / SPOT

    Most of us have been spending more and more time at home over the past year. It’s time to get out for a change of scenery, and what better activity than cafe hopping! Check out these unique cafes around Japan, each offering a safe and relaxing space to enjoy a day out. 

     

     

    [Saitama] Bath Cafe BIVOUAC

    This cafe located in Kumagaya City offers a full range of bath and sauna facilities, as well as a restaurant featuring healthy dishes filled with local, freshly-picked veggies. 

    Details: https://www.moshimoshi-nippon.jp/497213

     

     

     

    [Gifu] Activity Cafe Takayama Zenko-ji

    Set inside a Buddhist temple, this cafe invites anyone, regardless of faith or nationality, to enjoy a cup of tea while experiencing traditional culture. It’s also a great space to work remotely, with free Wi-fi!

    Details: https://www.moshimoshi-nippon.jp/484296

     

     

     

    [Tokyo] NANARIDA

    Filled with plants and light, NANARIDA has been dubbed a digital detox cafe, not allowing smartphones or laptops each Sunday. Leaving your phone with the staff will grant you a free beverage, so come enjoy some tea and conversation. 

    Details: https://www.moshimoshi-nippon.jp/493631

     

    TEXT: Natalie(MOSHI MOSHI NIPPON)

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